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ESPD Media of the Month: May 2020

Posted By Tiago Pereira, Thursday 7 May 2020

We are pleased to announce that the winners of the ESPD Media of the Month contest for May are Vasco Henriques and Ainar Drews (University of Oslo), with the following image of the solar chromosphere at high resolution:

Coronal jet and surge

Description: Here we see the sun's mid-atmosphere, the chromosphere, face on. These observations are targeting a region of moderate magnetic activity. The inner blue-wing of the Ca II K 393.4 nm line is imaged with a 13 nanometer bandpass using the CHROMIS double Fabry–Pérot instrument at the Swedish 1-meter Solar Telescope on the 25th of May, 2017. The darker regions feature a hydrodynamic web-like pattern known as "reverse granulation" with a contribution from propagating bright shock-fronts. In between these areas, clusters of bright points can be seen where bright arching fibrils seem to be anchored on. These fibrils are elongated and very slender when imaged in this wavelength, as slender as 0.1 arcsec or less than 75 km wide in this image. This is how finely we can observe the chromosphere of the Sun as of early 2020. Observations such as these help us understand the most complex region of the solar atmosphere and how mass and energy are transported between the surface of the sun and the multi-million degree corona.

See full resolution image on Wikimedia Commons.

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2020 ESPD Senior Prize awarded to Eric Priest

Posted By Etienne Pariat, Wednesday 29 April 2020

The European Solar Physics Division (ESPD) of the European Physical Society is honored to announce that Eric Priest (University of St Andrews, UK) has been awarded the ESPD Senior Prize 2020.

The prize is awarded for: " long-standing leadership via mentoring, supervising and field-defining textbooks and for fundamental contributions in key topics of solar magnetohydrodynamics, particularly magnetic reconnection in the solar atmosphere and solar coronal heating."

The ESPD board wishes to thank the members of the senior prize selection board for their time and expertise: Luis Bellot Rubio, Manolis Georgoulis, Louise Harra, Åke Nordlund Lidia Van Driel-Gesztelyi.

Eduard Kontar (ESPD President) and Étienne Pariat (ESPD Prize Committee Chairperson)

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ESPD Media of the Month: April 2020

Posted By Tiago Pereira, Monday 6 April 2020

We are pleased to announce that the winner of the ESPD Media of the Month contest for April is Daniel Nóbrega-Siverio (University of Oslo), with the following image of a coronal jet and surge in a radiation-MHD numerical simulation:

Coronal jet and surge

Description: This figure shows a snapshot from a solar bidimensional radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (R-MHD) numerical experiment by Nóbrega-Siverio et al. (2017, 2018) carried out using the Bifrost code (Gudiksen et al. 2011). In the left panel, a temperature, T, map from that simulation is shown, spanning from the upper layers of the convection zone up to the solar corona, where the location of the solar surface is indicated with a dash line at Z=0 Mm. In that panel, we can distinguish a dome-like structure that corresponds to a new emerged plasma that has raised from the solar interior and that is now being reconnected with the pre-existing coronal magnetic field. As a consequence of this magnetic reconnection process, two ejections are produced: a hot collimated coronal jet with an inverted-Y shape (or Eiffel tower) that reaches more than 1 MK; and a non-collimated ejection with a fang shape, known as surge, composed by cool plasma. The middle panel contains a map of the vertical velocity, uz, for the same instant and domain illustrated in the left panel. This panel shows that the coronal jet reaches velocities of more 150 km/s, in fact, the upwards velocities are up to 300 km/s (the color scale is saturated), while the surge has downward velocities, as maximum, of -50 km/s. The right panel contains a zoom out for the previous panel to highlight the reconnection site and the bidirectionial flow that leads to the hot coronal jet.

See full resolution image on Wikimedia Commons.

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2020 ESPD Thesis and Early Career Researcher Prizes awarded

Posted By Etienne Pariat, Wednesday 25 March 2020
The European Solar Physics Division board is delighted to present the 2020 ESPD Prize winners:

PhD Thesis Prize to Dr. Stefan Hofmeister (PhD carried at Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Austria) - Prize awarded for outstanding observational analysis of solar coronal holes, their magnetic fine structure and the associated high-speed solar wind streams.

Early Career Researcher Prize to Dr. Victor Réville (currently working at IRAP, France) - Prize awarded for fundamental contributions to creating self-consistent multi-dimensional numerical models of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration via wave turbulence.

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ESPD Media of the Month: March 2020

Posted By Tiago Pereira, Wednesday 4 March 2020

We are pleased to announce that the winner of the ESPD Media of the Month contest for March is Luc Rouppe van der Voort (University of Oslo), with the following movie of quiet sun granulation observed with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope:

Description: Movie of the solar photosphere observed with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) on La Palma, Spain. The movie shows solar granulation which is a result of convective motions of bubbles of hot gas that rise from the solar interior. When these bubbles reach the surface, the gas cools and flows down again in the darker lanes between the bright cells. In these so-called intergranular lanes, we can also see small bright points and more extended bright elongated structures. These are regions with strong magnetic fields. Instrument: Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope / CHROMIS wideband (wavelength 395.0 nm) Center coordinates: (x,y)=(36",-91") Duration: 01:08:22 hour:min:sec. Observers: Vasco Henriques and Ainar Drews (University of Oslo, Norway) Data reduction: Vasco Henriques and Luc Rouppe van der Voort (University of Oslo, Norway)

See full resolution video on Wikimedia Commons.

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EST solar gallery and book

Posted By Tiago Pereira, Thursday 20 February 2020
The European Solar Telescope project is publishing a solar media gallery that comprises free, high-quality images from a variety of solar phenomena. A stunning visual summary of this gallery is also being published as a PDF book called A Tour of the Sun.

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ESPD Media of the month contest now open!

Posted By Tiago Pereira, Thursday 30 January 2020
We are excited to present our new Media of the Month Contest, which is starting in February 2020. We encourage the whole community to submit high-quality images, videos or other media related to solar physics to Wikimedia Commons, and will be selecting a winner every month. Winning entries will be prominently displayed in our web page and advertised through the ESPD's media presence. More details on the WikiProject page and our Media of the Month page. The first winner will be announced in early March 2020.

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EPS 2020 Conference on Plasma Physics

Posted By Tiago Pereira, Tuesday 28 January 2020
The 47th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics (EPS 2020) is now accepting contributions. EPS 2020 will be held in Sitges, Spain from 22nd to 26th June 2020, and the deadline for abstract submission is February 21st. Organised by the EPS Division for Plasma Physics, joint sessions are organised at EPS 2020 that also include solar physics talks. More information at the meeting web site: www.epsplasma2020.eu

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European Solar Physics Division (ESPD) – 2020 PhD Thesis, Early Career Researcher and Senior Prizes: First Call for Nominations

Posted By Etienne Pariat, Monday 25 November 2019

Deadline: February 1st, 2020

 

Since 2017, the European Solar Physics Division (ESPD) of the European Physical Society (EPS) awards three prizes: the ESPD PhD Thesis Prize, the ESPD Early Career Researcher (Postdoc) Prize and the Senior Prize. These prizes are nomination-based. The deadline for nomination is February 1st, 2020.

The 2020 ESPD PhD Thesis Prize will be awarded to a young researcher whose PhD thesis/viva was defended in 2019.

The 2020 ESPD Early Career Prize will be awarded to a young researcher whose PhD was awadered after 01/01/2016 (with possible extension).

The 2020 ESPD Senior Prize will be awarded to a distinguished senior scientist for a life-long prolific career.

Further information about eligibility, documents to be included in the nomination package, and submission process for each prize can be found on the ESPD prizes webpage:

https://www.eps.org/members/group_content_view.asp?group=85203&id=641304#CallPrize

Étienne Pariat for the ESPD Prize Committee

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2019 ESPD Prizes awarded

Posted By Etienne Pariat, Friday 22 March 2019

The European Solar Physics Division board is delighted to present the 2019 ESPD Prize winners:

PhD Thesis Prize to Dr. Norbert Magyar (PhD carried at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) for significant contributions, using 3D magneto-hydrodynamics numerical experiments, to the study of waves and their relation to turbulence in the solar corona, in the framework of the PhD thesis.

Early Career Researcher Prize to Dr. Lakshmi Pradeep Chitta (currently at Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Germany) for ground breaking observational analysis highlighting the crucial role of small-scale photospheric magnetic fields in the structure and dynamics of the solar corona.

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