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School / Magnetism : 48th IFF Spring School Topological Matter - Topological Insulators, Skyrmions
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School / Magnetism : 48th IFF Spring School  Topological Matter - Topological Insulators, Skyrmions

The IFF Spring School provides a comprehensive introduction to the physics of topological matter. It offers a set of elementary lectures providing a solid foundation of theoretical concepts and phenomenology as well as experimental observations. A spectrum of important experimental and theoretical techniques is introduced that is of practical use in analyzing, characterizing, growing and preparing topological matter in different dimensions.

27/03/2017 to 07/04/2017
When: 27/03/2017
Where: Auditorium (Building 04.7)
Forschungszentrum Jülich
Jülich, DE - 
Germany
Contact: Barbara Daegener

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Program

 

The IFF Spring School provides a comprehensive introduction to the physics of topological matter. It offers a set of elementary lectures providing a solid foundation of theoretical concepts and phenomenology as well as experimental observations. A spectrum of important experimental and theoretical techniques is introduced that is of practical use in analyzing, characterizing, growing and preparing topological matter in different dimensions. The school provides an overview of current research topics from the discovery of novel topological matter to device concepts and potential applications. This content is distributed over four sections, which are briefly outlined below. The school comprises around 50 hours of lectures plus discussions and offers the opportunity to visit the participating Institutes in Forschungszentrum Jülich. All lectures will be given in English.

 

Please download the School Flyer here.

Please download the School Poster here.

 
Registered participants will receive a book of lecture notes that contains all of the material presented during the school.
 
Basics:
The topology of electronic states and fields in solids will be covered from a model analysis to insights from state-of-the-art first-principles electronic structure methods to include relativistic effects, in combination with lectures on topological classification and geometric phases. On the experimental side, transport phenomena will be discussed with special emphasis on the quantum, anomalous, and spin Hall effects, as well as their quantized counterparts.
 
Topological Solids:
An overview of topological insulators, topological metals, and related materials will be given on the basis of band structure properties, with particular focus on material aspects, dimensionality, and structural engineering. Methods of accessing and modelling transport properties in the context of quantum spin Hall effect or electron interference effects are highlighted.

 

Skyrmions:
The diverse physics of magnetic solitons (dynamics, emergent electrodynamics, and complex phases) and their corresponding observations will be covered, and their prospects for future spintronics applications will be scrutinized. The discussion will be based on three pillars of non-colinear magnetism: the derivation of spin-lattice and microscopic magnetic models, as well as the topological properties of magnetization fields.
 
Advanced Phenomena include the realization of Majorana bound states in topological superconductors paving the way for topological fault-tolerant quantum computation, as well as the subjects of geometric aspects of pumping in open systems, spin chains and spin ices, Kitaev materials, emergent interfacial topological effects, Floquet topological solids, and beyond.
 
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The IFF Spring School in Jülich

 

The annual IFF Spring Schools were first brought into being in 1970 by the “Institut für Festkörperforschung” (IFF) founded in
1969. Since then, they have made it possible for students and young scientists to gain a two-week insight into a current topic
related to condensed matter physics. As a result of a restructuring process within Forschungszentrum Jülich in 2011, four new
institutes emerged, namely the Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), the Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS), the Institute of
Complex Systems (ICS) and the Institute for Advanced Simulation (IAS). The IFF Spring School is now organized in succession by
these four institutes. The 48th Spring School 2017 will beorganized by PGI together with the Physics Institute II of the University of Cologne.

 

The mission of the Peter Grünberg Institute is the discovery and interpretation of new phenomena in condensed matter, the
development of new materials and innovation in experimental and theoretical methods. Exploratory research is conducted in
electronic systems, quantum phenomena and nanoelectronic with an emphasis on potential long-term applications in information
technology and beyond. Considerable resources from PGI are allocated to three major infrastructure facilities that are operated
in part in close cooperation with RWTH Aachen University under the umbrella of the Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA):

 

(i) the Ernst Ruska-Centre (ER-C) for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons,
(ii) the Helmholtz Nanoelectronics Facility (HNF) for the integration of structures, devices and circuits, and
(iii) the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (J-SRL) coordinating experiments at various synchrotron radiation facilities.

 

The Peter Grünberg Institute has a long track-record in advancing the field of spintronics, which was recognized through the Nobel
Prize awarded to our colleague Peter Grünberg in 2007, after whom the Institute was named. A particular timely example of
the role of spins in solids is witnessed in the field of topological matter.

 

The advancement of experimental condensed matter physics has a long history at the Physics Institute II of the University of Cologne. The seven professors of the institute cover a wide range of experimental techniques, including materials synthesis, transport measurements, scanning tunnelling microscopy, and various types of spectroscopic measurements. This, together with the very collaborative culture of the institute, allows for a comprehensive understanding of interesting materials. Recently, the research efforts of the institute have been largely focused on “quantum materials” to discover and understand novel quantum phenomena stemming from spin-orbit coupling, electron correlations, and topology

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