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New Data on Gender Inequality in Sciences Salaries

Posted By Administration, 02 November 2017

November, 1st 2017 - American Institute of Physics (AIP)

There is a difference between male and female physics faculty salaries and the culture of physics is partly to blame, according to an article that is available for free this month from Physics Today, the world's most influential and closely followed magazine devoted to physics and the physical sciences community.

The article, "Salaries for female physics faculty trail those for male colleagues," identifies key factors influencing the gender pay gap and offers potential solutions that include changes in the culture in physics departments. The article is available at https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3760.

Staff writer Toni Feder combined data from a 2010 report, “Gender Differences at Critical Transitions in the Careers of Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Faculty” (https://www.nap.edu/catalog/12062/gender-differences-at-critical-transitions-in-the-careers-of-science-engineering-and-mathematics-faculty), from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine that looked at hundreds of institutions with unpublished data from the American Institute of Physics (AIP) Statistical Research Center (SRC). AIP is the publisher of Physics Today.

What the unpublished data show is that female faculty members in physics have lower salaries compared to their equally qualified male colleagues. "The model says that if we have two people who are identical in every way, the woman will make, on average, 6 percent less than the man," said Susan White, assistant director of SRC, quoted in the Physics Today article.

The National Academies' study also found that there were inequities between men and women. Massachusetts Institute of Technology astronomer Claude Canizares, who co-chaired the study, explained that while universities do not purposely discriminate against women and minorities, inequities nevertheless persist.

According to the Physics Today article, other studies and observations support the data, with two key reasons for the gender gap disparity. First, women are less aggressive in their salary negotiations and also less likely to ask for a raise during their tenure at an institution. The second reason comes from the fact that men are overrepresented in some scientific fields, which introduces an implicit bias in university departments.

"Boys in the department give money to boys in the department,” said a senior researcher quoted anonymously in the Physics Today article.

To close the pay gap, MIT Professor Emerita Nancy Hopkins suggests that senior female faculty members need to serve on the hiring, promotion and editorial boards that are positions of power at most universities.

Efforts must also include male support to promote women and minorities in science. “It’s hard to break a glass ceiling by banging your head on it from below," Canizares said. "It’s easier to break it from above with a sledge hammer."

https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3760

Tags:  gender equality  inequalities  science  women in physics 

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Astronomer survey reveals gender and racial harassment

Posted By Administration, 11 July 2017
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International Day of Women and Girls in Science

Posted By Administration, 06 February 2017

On 15 December 2015, the United Nations General Assembly adopted resolution A/RES/70/212 declaring 11 February as the International Day of Women and Girls in Science.

Read the complete article in e-EPS.

Tags:  e-eps  newsletter  women in physics 

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CERN - Naturally I'm a scientist

Posted By Administration, 06 February 2017
CERN’s female scientists share their stories for the International Day of Women and Girls in Science: http://home.cern/about/updates/2017/02/naturally-im-scientist

Tags:  CERN  women in physics 

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Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the Asian Journal of Physics: Women in Physics

Posted By Administration, 31 October 2014

Deadline for manuscript submissions: March 14, 2015.

Special Issue Information
The Asian Journal of Physics invites authors of original articles and reviews exploring all aspects and issues, related to women in physics, from both present and historical perspective, to submit them to a Special Issue focused on this subject.
Until the 20th century, women did not have access to higher education institutions. Hence, with a very few exceptions, it was impossible for them to contribute to scientific discovery. There has been a gradual change in this trend since the beginning of the 20th century. Nevertheless, even nowadays, women’s representation in physics lags behind most other science disciplines, making up about 13% of faculty members in all physics degree–granting departments.
The Special Issue of the Asian Journal of Physics Vol 24, No 3, 2015 will focus on all aspects of the work and the impact of the women in physics. All contribution to this area are welcome.

View details about this on the website of the ASIAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICS.

Tags:  Asia  call  journal  women in physics 

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