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New Data on Gender Inequality in Sciences Salaries

Posted By Administration, 02 November 2017

November, 1st 2017 - American Institute of Physics (AIP)

There is a difference between male and female physics faculty salaries and the culture of physics is partly to blame, according to an article that is available for free this month from Physics Today, the world's most influential and closely followed magazine devoted to physics and the physical sciences community.

The article, "Salaries for female physics faculty trail those for male colleagues," identifies key factors influencing the gender pay gap and offers potential solutions that include changes in the culture in physics departments. The article is available at https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3760.

Staff writer Toni Feder combined data from a 2010 report, “Gender Differences at Critical Transitions in the Careers of Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Faculty” (https://www.nap.edu/catalog/12062/gender-differences-at-critical-transitions-in-the-careers-of-science-engineering-and-mathematics-faculty), from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine that looked at hundreds of institutions with unpublished data from the American Institute of Physics (AIP) Statistical Research Center (SRC). AIP is the publisher of Physics Today.

What the unpublished data show is that female faculty members in physics have lower salaries compared to their equally qualified male colleagues. "The model says that if we have two people who are identical in every way, the woman will make, on average, 6 percent less than the man," said Susan White, assistant director of SRC, quoted in the Physics Today article.

The National Academies' study also found that there were inequities between men and women. Massachusetts Institute of Technology astronomer Claude Canizares, who co-chaired the study, explained that while universities do not purposely discriminate against women and minorities, inequities nevertheless persist.

According to the Physics Today article, other studies and observations support the data, with two key reasons for the gender gap disparity. First, women are less aggressive in their salary negotiations and also less likely to ask for a raise during their tenure at an institution. The second reason comes from the fact that men are overrepresented in some scientific fields, which introduces an implicit bias in university departments.

"Boys in the department give money to boys in the department,” said a senior researcher quoted anonymously in the Physics Today article.

To close the pay gap, MIT Professor Emerita Nancy Hopkins suggests that senior female faculty members need to serve on the hiring, promotion and editorial boards that are positions of power at most universities.

Efforts must also include male support to promote women and minorities in science. “It’s hard to break a glass ceiling by banging your head on it from below," Canizares said. "It’s easier to break it from above with a sledge hammer."

https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3760

Tags:  gender equality  inequalities  science  women in physics 

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Leading women in Science: Why are we still so few?

Posted By Administration, 03 October 2017
Updated: 03 October 2017
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Astronomer survey reveals gender and racial harassment

Posted By Administration, 11 July 2017
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February 11th, the UN International Day of Women and Girls in Science

Posted By Gina Gunaratnam, 23 March 2017

On 22 December 2015, the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted a resolution to establish an annual International Day to recognise the critical role that women and girls play in science and technology communities: “Girls continue to face stereotypes and social and cultural restrictions, limiting access to education and funding for research, preventing them from scientific careers and reaching their full potential. Women remain a minority in science research and decision-making”, wrote Irina Bukova, Director-General of the UNESCO. A celebration event took place on February 9th 2017 morning at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris, focusing on Building capacity and Empowering women and girls and on various actions on Women, Science and Society.

Read the complete article by Claudine Hermann and Véronique Pierron-Bohnes in e-EPS.

Tags:  gender equality  United Nations  women in science 

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Women scientists

Posted By Administration, 05 February 2017
Updated: 06 February 2017

500 women scientists: https://500womenscientists.org/

Tags:  gender equality 

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IOP focuses on gender balance and research by school students at teacher conference

Posted By Administration, 31 January 2017

24 January 2017 - The Institute of Physics

Sessions on improving the gender balance in physics and bringing independent research projects into the school curriculum were among the IOP’s inputs to the four-day Association for Science Education (ASE) conference on 4–7 January, with a talk by the Institute’s Charles Tracy chosen as one of 12 keynote events to be highlighted in the conference programme.

Read the complete article on the website of the IOP.

Tags:  congress  gender bias  gender equality  IOP 

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STEM Gender Equality Congress

Posted By Administration, 17 January 2017

The congress will take place from 8th - 9th June 2017 in Berlin, Germany.
Visit the website of the congress for more info: https://stemgenderequality.com/

Tags:  congress  gender equality  STEM 

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International Day of Women & Girls in Science

Posted By Administration, 09 January 2017
The International Day of Women & Girls in Science will be held at United Nations Headquarters on 10 February 2017.
Registration is now open: https://t.co/tFbc2jCVwo

Tags:  conference  gender equality  United Nations 

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Thursday 3 November is European Equal Pay Day

Posted By Administration, 03 November 2016

Brussels, 31 October 2016 - Statement of First Vice-President Timmermans and Commissioners Thyssen and Jourová on European Equal Pay Day

Thursday 3 November is European Equal Pay Day, representing the day in the year when women across Europe stop being paid due to the gender pay gap; with the average hourly wage for women in Europe being 16.7 % lower than it is for men, they in effect work 16% of the year for free.

Ahead of this occasion, First Vice-President Timmermans, Commissioner Thyssen and Commissioner Jourová said:

"If the average European man stops work today, he still gets paid as much this year as the average European woman who keeps working until 31 December. That is not fair, not sustainable and frankly not acceptable. European employers must stop sending the message that women are worth two pay cheques less than men each year.

Men and women in the European Union are equal –that is one of our fundamental values. But on our labour market, even in the year of 2016, this is not yet a reality.

The truth is that the workplace remains an area where women and men don't have the same chances. For equivalent work, men are on average paid more.

The glass-ceiling still exists: although more women have a university degree than men, less than 5% of company leaders in the EU are women. This is a waste of female talent. In general, women often work in lower paid sectors, and in addition, men are less likely to interrupt their careers and to take care of their children or of dependent relatives. As a result, it is most of the time women who spend less time in paid work and have a harder time to combine work and family.

These inequalities are reflected in the hourly pay for women. It is still 16.7 % lower than that of their male colleagues. At the current pace the gender pay gap is declining so slowly that it will be 2086 before women are paid as much as men.

The Commission is committed to work hard to close the gender pay gap. We have consulted social partners and the wider public on how we should better tackle the challenge of work-life balance so that both women and men can achieve their full potential on the labour market while enjoying family life.

Now that the consultations with our social partners are closed, the Commission will come forward with a proposal for working families in 2017 which will not only help working parents and carers to find the right balance between their private and professional life, but will also increase women's participation in the labour market. More equality in the uptake and choice in leave schemes is needed, as well as flexible working arrangements and more affordable childcare. Men should be able to choose to care for their families in the same way as women can do and businesses should be able to retain and promote the skilled women that Europe needs. The Commission will also continue to support Member States' efforts to combat the gender pay gap on the ground.

So today, on European Equal Pay Day, we take a stand to give women and men the same opportunities on the labour market. The same pay for the same work in the same place is not only a fundamental European value, our competitiveness will also depend on allowing female talent to flourish so all of us are lifted up."

More information in the  EU and country specific factsheets

Tags:  Europe  gender equality 

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European conference on gender equality in higher education and research

Posted By Administration, 27 June 2016

The French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), the Université Paris Diderot, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle- Paris 3 and the Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (USPC), with strong support from the French Ministry for National Education, Higher Education and Research, are inviting researchers, professors, administrators, policy-makers, practitioners and students to Paris, on 12-14 September 2016, to attend the 9th European Conference on Gender Equality in Higher Education.

Visit the conference website for details.


Tags:  2016  conferences  gender equality 

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